Five Ways Adult Horsewomen Rock the Riding Gig

Life experiences give adult horsewomen an edge.

CFD Ride a Test 2016 131

1.We don’t care what other people think anymore

Gone are those awful days of following every new fad and fashion hoping that we would fit into the cool kids group. The heck with that nonsense. If others don’t like what you are doing, they don’t have to watch. You found your passion and along the way you have grown strong and sure of yourself. You have met some fabulous friends that you would have never met outside of the horse world. Never again will you waste your time trying to please people that don’t understand or care about you.

2. We have already learned the value of a budget

Yep. Learning how to use your money wisely is part of growing up. Very few of us in the horse world have an unlimited budget. Remember that day when you realized that people admired you for cleverly finding that bargain outfit from the resale shop? (They wished they had found something like that.) You looked great and still could afford to go to the show that month (or take a lesson, or clinic with someone). “Put your money where your mouth is” doesn’t mean we should go into debt pursuing what is important to us. Wear that Calvin Klein dress from Ross Dress for Less to the banquet when you pick up your award.

3. We are experts at negotiating with our body parts

Our younger selves flew unheeding into every activity that came our way. When our teachers asked us to change something about our posture or the way we reacted we were quick to say, “I just can’t do it that way”. Years of experience have taught us patience with the eye on long-term gains. We have learned that practice allows us to learn a better way to do things. We now recognize that what seems impossible to change at first, if you persist, becomes easier and easier. We no longer take our bodies taken for granted. We have learned to curate what can be done with our aging framework and have acquired a large bag of tricks that work around what truly cannot be changed about our bodies. Example: with a height of 5’3” I was never destined to be a center on the girls basketball team. Put me on a horse and I’m a force to be reckoned with.

4. We have learned that feeling stupid means you are learning

By now we know that staying in your comfort zone means never improving or growing. You have to risk something to gain something. The best lessons for improvement are the lessons where you get corrected for making mistakes or pushed when you’d rather stay in your safe zone. We know that these lessons do not feel good at the time. The lesson where the instructor verbally pats you on the head and says you’re doing fine may make you feel supported but did you learn something new? Did that lesson show you that you were capable of doing more? Did that “feel good” lesson push you up to a new skill level? Probably not. Risk and Persist is your motto now. Go for it. You’ve got this.

5. We are thrilled to be living the horse life on any level

Luminaries like Carl Hester and Charlotte Dujardin inspire us but most of us do not want to live their lives. We love our family, our work outside the horse world, our homes, and our children. Don’t get us wrong; we value learning important lessons from these horse idols. We apply these important lessons to our non-Olympic bound horse. These small successes are very important to us. When we feel our 12 yr. old OTTB move freely into a balanced shoulder in we are as euphoric. We won our own special Gold Medal in personal bests. These small but mighty moments with our beloved horse is why we are and will continue to be, Rocking Adult Horsewomen.

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Author: equestriannotebook

Welcome. After thirty years of immersion in the equine profession, during which time I trained horses and students across disciplines and breeds, I am embarking on a new expedition - blogging. My training philosophy focuses on improving the performance and partnership between the rider and the horse. The purpose of this blog is to share my experiences and to hear about yours. I look forward to taking this journey with you. My home is in Clermont, Florida on an 11-acre training facility with my husband Bill, our dachshund, Krieger, a couple of barn cats and the horses. My career brought me to Florida in 1990 as a working trainer and rider. I am currently serving as Vice President of Central Florida Dressage and am the editor of The Centerline, CFD’s eNewsletter. Below are a few of my credentials B.S. in Animal Industry from Penn State University U.S.D.F Rider Silver Medal U.S.D.F. Certified Instructor (T-2) U.S.D.F. Graduate (with distinction) Learner Judge Program U.S.E.F. Technical Delegate “R” F.E.I. Level One Steward The five years I spent as assistant trainer to Dorita Konyot established a life long philosophy and training style that I continue to practice and teach to others.

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